Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture

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Preservation
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture

Since the beginning of my involvement with this remarkable road, I have been a preservation advocate and, at times, activist.

It began in 1992 when I was invited to attend a meeting held by the first National Park Service study group tasked with exploring the creation of a recognized federal corridor for the route. In 2001, subsequent to the passage by congress of the Route 66 Corridor Act, I attended another meeting where guidelines for the administration of the program were set.

In 1999, I helped draft language for a State Senate resolution that stopped a proposed bypass of my own community, and the same year wrote a successful National Register of Historic Places nomination for the one-mile stretch of original Route 66 where I live.

Route 66 Bridge      Route 66 Roadbed
The 1937 Neosho River Bridge at Miami, Oklahoma was destroyed in 1997. Part of a 2-mile section of original western Oklahoma paving excavated in 2000.

In 2002, I was a team member in preparing the Oklahoma Route 66 Roadbed Documentation Project, commissioned by the State Historic Preservation Office and designed to account for all of the road's alignments as well as associated structures such as bridges and permanent markers. This document made it possible to develop priorities for additional preservation efforts.

More recently, I joined a federal advisory council for the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program. Fellow members consisted of a diverse and dynamic group of preservation officials, architectural historians, representatives of departments of transportation, and others with expertise in areas aimed at assisting the National Park Service to more effectively administer the program while helping to preserve and promote the road.

Tower Theatre Oklahoma City      Lucille's Hydro Oklahoma
The Tower Theater's neon sign in Oklahoma City is a grand survivor of urban renewal. This Hydro, Oklahoma landmark's future has been ensured for future generations.

From Illinois to California, hundreds of enthusiasts and many organizations are actively involved in the preservation of Route 66. There have been significant losses to the highway over the years, and there will be more. But there have been some impressive rescues, as well, and the level of cooperation among all involved is on the rise. Every preservation initiative helps raise awareness, even if a particular effort fails. And it is awareness, ultimately, that will ensure the survival of the road.

Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture

Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
Route 66 Photography Roadside Culture
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